Category Archives: MUNRO, AL

AL MUNRO, BENJAMIN STORCH, and TANIA SMITH

On view until Thursday 9 June

We are pleased to present you with the exhibition catalogues for Pleated Logic by AL MUNRO, Resonance by BENJAMIN STORCH, plus Untitled (domestic gestures) by TANIA SMITH in Black Box Projects.

> Click here to view the lookbook for AL MUNRO
> Click here to view the lookbook for BENJAMIN STORCH
> Click here to view the lookbook for TANIA SMITH

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> AL MUNRO

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> BENJAMIN STORCH

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> TANIA SMITH

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Al Munro Interview

Although Al Munro’s oeuvre is bursting with colour, flocked with glitter, full of texture and composed of patterns, a scientific basis that is layered beneath these vibrant surfaces informs and inspires her practice.  Munro is based in Canberra at the Australian National University where she has recently undergone an interdisciplinary art/maths fellowship with the Department of Applied Maths, and completed a Phd that involved looking at the capabilities of textiles to describe scientific codes and mathematical data. It seems that Munro is able to explore complex theories, ideas and systems through textiles, often resulting in work that condenses her findings into geometric maps and dynamic forms. An appreciation of historical, cultural and contemporary textiles is also evident throughout Munro’s practice, which often adopts paint on canvas or board to interpret these ideas. The artist recently completed three residencies in Asia where she conducted research into traditional practices, whilst also curating the exhibition …a piece of string…, as to showcase interdisciplinary contemporary textiles. Pleated Logic is Munro’s newest body of work, which pulls together a lot of the investigations and aesthetic notions from her recent experiences…

1) You have completed two residencies in Chiang Mai in Thailand recently that you have credited as informing Pleated Logic. What particular findings or experiences from these international immersions were the inspiration?
My residencies at Chiang Mai University Faculty of Fine Art in 2014 and 2015 gave me the opportunity to spend extended time in the studio developing new works as well as working into existing bodies of work. The colours of the contemporary textiles produced by the Hmong and Karen ‘hill tribe’ people are a constant interested to me – brightly coloured and even fluoro synthetic yarns woven and embroidered into traditional patterns appeal to my sense of colour. On the trip to Chiang Mai in January 2015 I also became interested in the pleated fabric lengths produced for the contemporary versions of traditional Karen garments. These highly coloured and tightly pleated striped fabric lengths have led to this new body of work that looks at pleating as a way to distort pattern.

2) Last year you also completed a residency in Japan. What did this experience involve?
In Japan I explored the relationships between the scientific imaging of crystallographic symmetry groups and traditional Japanese geometric repeat patterns. I undertook research at museums in Tokyo and Kyoto, including the Paper Museum, Edo Textile Museum and the Nishijin Textile Centre, where I studied samples of geometric patterning on paper and textiles. These patterns are also found in the 17 main ‘wallpaper’ groups of crystallography, the field of science that studies the geometry and structure of atoms within most matter. The residency extended my long term practice of using textile and drawing-based media to explore the way that the natural world is inscribed as a code, pattern or formula within scientific images.

3) What would you consider the biggest or one of the biggest break-through moments in your PhD art-making or research?
I think this would have to be the realisation of the complex spatial possibilities of textile-based media. Not only do textiles describe the fundamental Euclidean spatial concepts of point, line and plane – indeed the term line in geometry is derived from the latin ‘linea’ for linen or thread – but textiles also allow us to realise and explore more complex forms of space such as those of non-Euclidean geometries. The capacity for textile forms to stretch, flex, fold and curve means that both their artistic and mathematical potential is huge.

4) Who would you consider some of your primary artistic influences?
Oh gosh now there’s a question…
Louse Bourgeois’ fabric works are a constant joy.
Marcel Duchamp’s various string works for the way he made work that was both experiment and finished artwork, and for its interrogation of the spatial possibilities of thread. His work ‘Three Standard Stoppages’ provided a light bulb moment for me in relation to textiles and space.
And many many more…

On view from Saturday 14 May to Thursday 9 June 2016

Afternoon drinks with the Artists, Saturday 14 May, 3-5pm

> AL MUNRO, Pleated Logic
The paintings in the exhibition, Pleated Logic, continue my interest in exploring the way textile forms, such a pattern and structure, allow us to reconsider the spaces of abstract painting. This exhibition draws on ideas developed on recent residencies in northern Thailand, and my interest in the heavily pleated Hmong textiles found in the region.

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> BENJAMIN STORCH, Resonance
Inspired by imagery of dynamical systems in nature and science, my work has been revolving around fluid, orbital loops for a good number of years. The exhibition will feature some new works in alabaster alongside works in copper and stainless steel.

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> TANIA SMITH, Untitled (domestic gestures)
The videos that comprise the Untitled (domestic gestures) series show absurd moments of escape. Like the slapstick of Buster Keaton, a woman is trapped in a loop of pleasure and anxiety. The videos are an archive of absurd gestures – repetitious, futile, joyous and mischievous.

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New in the Stockroom – Al Munro

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Al Munro:

Five glistening screen prints from Munro’s ‘Mineral Crystal’ series are now at the Gallery. These works transcribe the patterns of knit-work into prints that have then been flocked with glitter, as to imbue the diagrams with the natural sparkle of crystals. We currently have minerals of various shapes in Sapphire Blue, Multi-colour, Metal Silver, Pewter Green and Choc Brown (pictured).

> To view all of Al Munro’s currently available works, click here
> Sign up to Al Munro’s email list here.
Al Munro
‘Choc Brown Mineral Crystal’ 2012 screen print, glitter flocking on Stonehenge paper – unique
113.5 x 78.5cm
Frame size: 118 x 83cm. $2,200

Call for Proposals: Op Art, 2016

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Brenda May Gallery is seeking proposals from professional practising artists in Australia and New Zealand for the curated exhibition Op Art.

Op Art is a genre that explores the varying illusionary optical effects that can be influenced by manipulating geometrical shapes and repeating colours.

For further information, please click here.

Al Munro, ‘Hyperbolic Infinite V’ 2015, acrylic on canvas, 40.5cm diameter – $650

30 Years | 30 Artists | 30 Works

30 Years | 30 Artists | 30 Works
On view until 19 December 2015

Our 30th Anniversary exhibition is now on view featuring a range of artworks including sculpture, painting, drawing, photography, ceramics and video. The thirty artists featured in this exhibition are a tiny sample indicative of the scope of the artists represented over the last thirty years in Sydney.
▶ Click here to view the exhibition page
▶ Click here to view the catalogue

The catalogue is available for $10 ($12.50 posted Australia wide)
Reserve your copy by email or visit the Gallery to pick one up.

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Important dates + changes in 2016

Brenda May Gallery 30th Anniversary Exhibition | 24 November to 19 December 2015
Last day of business for the year | 19 December 2015, 10am-5pm
Christmas Closure Dates | 20 December 2015 to 28 January 2016 (inclusive)
First Exhibitions for 2016, Sculpture 2016: Bronze and Grayson Cooke – video | 29 January to 18 February 2016
2 Danks Street Gala opening event | 3 February 2016, 6-8pm

2016 will see a change to our exhibition structure.
From next year, our monthly shows will open on a Saturday and end on a Thursday.

30 Years | 30 Artists | 30 Works – 24 November to 19 December 2015

This year marks the 30th year of Brenda May’s career as Gallery Director—from Access Contemporary Art Gallery in Balmain, Forest Lodge, and Redfern, to Brenda May Gallery here at Danks Street. In 2015 we looked through our archives to create a retrospective exhibition featuring one work to represent each year as a celebration of the many artists’ careers the Gallery has fostered.

The thirty artists featured in this exhibition are a tiny sample indicative of the scope of the artists represented over the last thirty years:
Tanmaya Bingham
Robert Boynes
Jim Croke
Sybil Curtis
Todd Fuller
James Guppy
Waratah Lahy
Melinda Le Guay
Al Munro
Carol Murphy
Mylyn Nguyen
Catherine O’Donnell
Leslie Oliver
Lezlie Tilley
Peter Tilley
Nicole Welch
Alex Asch (Beaver Galleries)
Jo Bertini (Olsen Irwin)
Graham Blondel
Kate Dorrough (Arthouse Gallery)
Caroline Durré
Rachel Ellis (King Street Gallery on William)
Brenda Humble
John Kelly (Liverpool Street Gallery)
Barbara Licha
Leo Robba (King Street Gallery on William)
Anne Ross
Marc Standing (King Street Gallery on William)
Jim Thalassoudis (Nanda\Hobbs Contemporary)
Hadyn Wilson (Frances Keevil Gallery)

▶ Click here to view the exhibition page
▶ Click here to view the catalogue

The catalogue is available for $10 ($12.50 posted Australia wide)
Reserve your copy by email or visit the Gallery to pick one up.

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Important dates + changes in 2016

Brenda May Gallery 30th Anniversary Exhibition | 24 November to 19 December 2015
Last day of business for the year | 19 December 2015, 10am-5pm
Christmas Closure Dates | 20 December 2015 to 28 January 2016 (inclusive)
First Exhibitions for 2016, Sculpture 2016: Bronze and Grayson Cooke – video | 29 January to 18 February 2016
2 Danks Street Gala opening event | 3 February 2016, 6-8pm

2016 will see a change to our exhibition structure.
From next year, our shows will open on a Saturday and end on a Thursday.


Untitled Show

Our Untitled Show features artworks that differ in style, medium, inspiration and affect. The only unifying quality is that they do not allow audiences to rely on a title for further instruction, and instead are open to interpretation.

Artists include Tanmaya Bingham, Robert Boynes, Jim Croke, Sybil Curtis, Todd Fuller, James Guppy, Waratah Lahy, Melinda Le Guay, Al Munro, Carol Murphy, Mylyn Nguyen, Catherine O’Donnell, Leslie Oliver, Lezlie Tilley, and Peter Tilley.

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Untitled Show

On view 29 September to 24 October 2015

Screen Shot 2015-10-02 at 5.20.21 pmAl Munro, ‘Untitled 2’ 2015
acrylic paint on plywood, 43 x 31cm

‘Untitled’ would appear to be the most common name attributed to a work of art. Despite the word denoting nothingness, the power of the untitled work is that it has the ability to express the opposite. Artists usually name works to convey something further about the piece to an audience, whether that is a feeling, a description, or a nod to its inspiration. An untitled work, on the other hand, asks the audience to think and question a little more in order to uncover meaning.

The works in this exhibition will differ in style, medium, inspiration and affect. The only unifying quality will be that the works do not allow audiences to rely on a title for further instruction and will instead be entirely open to interpretation.

 

…a piece of string… curated by Al Munro and Irianna Kanellopoulou exhibition lookbooks

We are pleased to present you with the exhibition catalogues for Wanderland by Irianna Kanellopoulou and …a piece of string… featuring Jacqueline Bradley, Kirsty Darlaston, Lucy Irvine, Melinda Le Guay, Jemima Parker, and the exhibition curator Al Munro. Both exhibitions will be on view until Saturday 29 August.

▶ Click here to view the lookbook for …a piece of string…
▶ Click here to view the lookbook for Irianna Kanellopoulou

 

4ae2474c-6078-4656-b82e-e5e4f911ae6bAl Munro

a piece of string

Wanderland


 

SCREEN SURFACE curated by Geoffrey Weary
Black Box Projects
Until 29 August 2015

Films by Frazer Bull-Clark, Katherine Berger, Jing Feng (Sophy Feng), Graham Burchett, and Harley Ives (courtesy of Chalk Horse Gallery, Sydney).

Katherine BergerKatherine Berger, ‘Suspension’ 2015
repurposed found 16mm film decayed by the artist and digital transfer, stereo sound – 5:35mins, ed of 6